Sit Targets

May 25, 2008

As the “San Jose” benches near their completion, a lot of detail work needs to be done. We aim for a natural looking seating pattern, so the benches will add subtle random changes to the positions. The image shows Ivanova tweaking the different positions. When I came into the workshop and saw the candy colors she assigned to the parts, I could not help but wonder if we should venture into a delicately textured candy colored San Jose as well. It would certainly fit into a lot of playful homes. What do you think?

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Math melts my brain

May 22, 2008

SL rotations have been quite mysterious to me. Their specific relevance to me is in the fact that they are used as a llSitTarget parameter. In my studying of them (and related topics) I have learned what radians are, and grads, and the relationship between radians, grads, degrees and your garden variety circle. I am beginning even to glimpse why rotations are used in SL instead of just using degrees in a normal vector (I mean, I understand vectors), though I have no idea what gimbal lock is.
My understanding of SL rotations, as given in the LSL wiki is thus: The rotation is composed of four floats. The first three floats can be thought of as a vector, which I guess means that, in essence, they are a vector. So those first three floats describe, in radians, a direction in space. One radian is equal to 180 degrees divided by PI, or 57.296 degrees.
The first trick is to understand what a radian is and how to use it. Then to know that the fourth float describes a rotation around the direction (as an axis?) described by the first three.
These are all the words. I have yet to put them together into a clear mental picture of how a rotation works. Bah! This is all just an invention anyway, to help us understand why the toast always lands jam side down.

We had a heyday yesterday, putting out the whole range of the San Jose meeting benches for the first time, and finalizing (or so we thought) the fabric/wood combinations. Even though I am the “commercial mind” behind GREENE concept, I share the same obsession for quality as Ivanova, and working in graphic design for 18 years now made me value details very much. So there always seems to be an improvement to be made, a texture to be shaded a notch more, a detail to be enhanced. But as Ivanova said the other day – a line has to be drawn somewhere. So the San Jose’s will be finished soon.

Why the name San Jose? The benches are ideal for informal meetings. I see them in lounges, clubs, offices, exhibition spaces. That does not mean they can’t fit into private homes, but for me the San Jose is a “Web 2.0” piece of furniture. And what is more “Web 2.0” than San Jose, entrance to the Silicon Valley?

Sculpts from afar…

May 21, 2008

… look rather bizarre. The texture of the sculpt has already loaded, the sculptmap not yet, so the prim shows its original shape.

Why did GREENE concept get started?

There are people, I know, who seek to make a real world living using the Second Life platform, or other virtual platforms.
If anyone asked me why I’m doing this, I would say “For the pure enjoyment of creation and seeing where it will go, where it will take me.” I should point out that I am not counting on GREENE concept to pay off my mortgage. It is a part of the overall enjoyment of participating in a virtual world. Though breaking even on all our creation costs would certainly be a thrill.
I believe one valuable aspect of a virtual world, wherein you participate in meaningful relationships and endeavors, is that virtual world experiences can help build real world skills.
So however I may talk about it, GREENE concept has already served me.

Every time I get positive feedback or suggestions from people, I am simultaneously excited that others find value in our ideas and designs, and, I admit, fearful of disappointing. Then I remember that I am here to enjoy the experience.
GREENE concept got started when my friend Peter saw that I enjoyed building things, and he liked what I was creating. I remember the first time he took me to a furniture store, and I discovered that building furniture was something that I really did enjoy doing. I like both creating the shapes and the textures that adorn them. While Peter is our animator, creating animation is something else I’d like to try my hand at as well. Concentrating on, and providing details that create a sense of realism is one of my goals.

So, how can GREENE concept serve you?

Anticipation

May 20, 2008

This is so exciting for me. Every day we are getting positive comments from different friends and associates, and constructive criticism from friends with a variety of tastes.
I have to admit, when I first began designing a 270 degree circular, backless couch. I had no idea how well received the San Jose might be. It just seemed like a nice idea to have a single seating solution that allowed a number of avatars to face each other in a sociable setting. A seven prim couch that can seat five avatars is a bit more useful than I first believed.
One of our working conventions is the creation of quality, low prim furniture. The use of sculpts to this end has led to me to consider the best creative use of them. Should we find ourselves looking at a target market allowing freer use of higher prim counts, I realized today that this practice will increase the skill with which we can create very detailed products more quickly.

Thank you all for your input and friendship.

And I’d like to announce that, thanks to Elusyve Jewell, I now have toast.

Pretty rust

May 19, 2008

[13:36] Ivanova Shostakovich: What about a rusty texture for the handle?
[13:36] Peter Stindberg: mhmm
[13:36] Peter Stindberg: The idea is not bad
[13:37] Peter Stindberg: Of course it must not look rusty
[13:37] Ivanova Shostakovich: I know what you mean. It has to be a pretty rust.
[13:37] Peter Stindberg: 🙂
[13:37] Peter Stindberg: Shiny rust!
[13:37] Peter Stindberg: Smooth rust!
[13:38] Peter Stindberg: lol, I’ll put this dialogue on the blog!
[13:38] Ivanova Shostakovich: Trust in Rust!